Anoestrous Cow Program

A period of non-cycling called "anoestrus", following calving is normal and cows will start coming on heat as the uterus recovers from pregnancy and reduces in size. Typically cows will first ovulate six weeks after calving.
Non-cycling cows after the start of mating, also known as No Visible Oestrus (NVO) or anoestrous cows, are a common problem on most dairy farms in New Zealand. These 'non-cyclers' reduce the reproductive performance of the herd and consequently reduce the financial performance of the farm, as cows take longer to become pregnant and hence produce less milk.
There are two types of non-cyclers:
1. Cows that have ovulated (i.e. ovaries are 'cycling') but cows have not displayed a detected heat (silent oestrus or 'missed heat').
2. Cows that are yet to ovulate

Conditions that prevent cows coming into oestrus post-calving include:
- Inadequate nutrition pre- and post-calving.
- Any chronic debilitating disease, such as uterine infection (metritis), left displaced abomasum and lameness, or other cause of excessive weight loss.
First calving heifers usually take longer show start cycling activity due to the nutritional stresses resulting from continued growth and lactation, and often make up a higher proportion of non cycling cows.
Treating anoestrous cows prior to the start of mating with a DIB-Synch Plus program provides the best economic return primarily as treated cows have an average of 18 more days in milk the next season.

See the latest news story on AgriHeath's new video series for Ready to Mate. or alternatively view individual videos below. 



Anoestrous Cow Program



A period of non-cycling called "anoestrus", following calving is normal and cows will start coming on heat as the uterus recovers from pregnancy and reduces in size. Typically cows will first ovulate six weeks after calving.

Non-cycling cows after the start of mating, also known as No Visible Oestrus (NVO) or anoestrous cows, are a common problem on most dairy farms in New Zealand. These 'non-cyclers' reduce the reproductive performance of the herd and consequently reduce the financial performance of the farm, as cows take longer to become pregnant and hence produce less milk.

There are two types of non-cyclers:
1. Cows that have ovulated (i.e. ovaries are 'cycling') but cows have not displayed a detected heat (silent oestrus or 'missed heat').
2. Cows that are yet to ovulate















Conditions that prevent cows coming into oestrus post-calving include:
- Inadequate nutrition pre- and post-calving.
- Any chronic debilitating disease, such as uterine infection (metritis), left displaced abomasum and lameness, or other cause of excessive weight loss.

First calving heifers usually take longer show start cycling activity due to the nutritional stresses resulting from continued growth and lactation, and often make up a higher proportion of non cycling cows.

Treating anoestrous cows prior to the start of mating with a DIB-Synch Plus program provides the best economic return primarily as treated cows have an average of 18 more days in milk the next season.













See the latest news story on AgriHeath's new video series for Ready to Mate. or alternatively view individual videos below. 









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